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The benefits of human resources certification

June 23rd, 2017 No comments

The benefits of human resources certification

 

shrm 1

Many HR professionals devote hours of their own time studying for HR certification exams. Once they become certified, those HR professionals devote their own financial resources and time to continuing education so that they can maintain certification.

HR certification – Benefits to HR professionals and their organizations.

 

HR certification benefits for employees

The reasons individuals pursue certifications include demonstrating one’s professional achievement, fulfilling personal satisfaction, helping in career advancement, enhancing one’s understanding of the field, and earning recognition from peers.

Earning a certification may help an individual make a favorable impression during a job interview for showing potential employer about his/her knowledge and competencies and has the capability to do that job.

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  • Employee’s dedication to his/her HR career and updated with latest HR trends.
  • It gives more perception of more competent, more qualified and capable of performing better.
  • It helps in group decision making among peer since certified employee may be given more consideration.
  • It boosts employee’s moral and motivation for work. It is clearly reflected in self-confidence and self-satisfaction
  • HR certification considered as receiving better opportunities and higher salary and advancement

 

HR certification benefits for employer

 

From the organization’s perspective, HR certifications are used as a selection tool to identify the best fit and qualified candidate for the position.

 

Certifications help organizations determine whether applicants or employees can perform at an acceptable level in his job.

Employers can also use certifications to present an image of employee respect and authority.

Certification leads to lead more consistent ways to deal with information, challenges, conflicts etc., related to HR.

Encourage employees to perform in a better way with up to date skills and competencies.

 

Difference between HR certifications

The differences between the four designations are the amount of relevant work experience and level of training. The SHRM-CP and PHR are basic certifications and on a similar level of experience, while the SHRM-SCP and SPHR are both senior-level certifications. Candidates need to meet certain requirements for each type of certification. Here is a typical profile for each:

 

SHRM-CP 

  • Serves as a point of contact for staff and stakeholders
  • Delivers HR services
  • Performs operational HR functions
  • Implements policies and strategies
  • Requires at least three years of experience in an HR-related role if the candidate has obtained less than a Bachelor’s degree
  • Professionals with a Bachelor’s degree in an HR-related field require at least one year of experience in an HR role
  • Professionals with a Graduate degree require one year of experience in an HR role unless their degree is HR-related
  • Understands SHRM’s Body of Competency & Knowledge (BoCK)

SHRM-SCP

  • Develops HR strategies
  • Leads HR functions
  • Analyzes performance metrics
  • Aligns HR strategies to organizational goals
  • Has three-to-seven years of HR-related experience
  • Has an understanding of SHRM’s new Body of Competency & Knowledge (BoCK)

PHR

  • Focuses on program implementation
  • Has tactical/logistical orientation
  • Has accountability to another HR professional within the organization
  • Has two to four years of exempt-level generalist HR work experience, but because of career length may lack the breadth and depth of a more senior-level generalist
  • Has not had progressive HR work experience by virtue of career length
  • Focuses his or her impact on the organization within the HR department rather than organization wide
  • Commands respect through the credibility of knowledge and the use of policies and guidelines to make decisions

SPHR

  • Designs and plans rather than implements
  • Focuses on the “big picture”
  • Has ultimate accountability in the HR department
  • Has six to eight years of progressive HR experience
  • Has breadth and depth of HR generalist knowledge
  • Uses judgment obtained with time and application of knowledge
  • Has generalist role within the organization
  • Understands the effect of decisions made within and outside of the organization
  • Understands the business, not just the HR function
  • Manages relationships; has influence within the overall organization
  • Commands credibility within the organization, community, and field by experience
  • Possesses excellent negotiation skills

Certified individuals have usually issued a certificate attesting that they have met the standards of the credentialing organization and are entitled to make the public aware of their credentialed status, usually through the use of initials (i.e., SHRM-SCP or SPHR) after their names.

Your HR Career Success Depends Upon New Skills and Certification

To be an effective HR professional, candidates not only need to understand concepts such as strategic management, workforce planning, HR development and organizational management, but they also require practical skills to implement these concepts.

Online Master Certificate in Human Resource Management program is an ideal way to gain critical skills and prepare for the SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP certifications.

Check online certification program here

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DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE TRAINING STRATEGY

January 23rd, 2016 No comments

training

When you do take on a training effort, you’ll want to be sure you’re spending your money wisely. It’s therefore best to create an overall training strategy to steer your plans for staff development.

Here are some guidelines to help make your training efforts successful:

ANALYZE YOUR NEEDS

Take the time to carefully analyze your needs when designing your training plan. This will help you choose the right type of training for your requirements.

IDENTIFY SKILL GAPS

You can do this by looking at a written job description (make sure you have one!) and comparing the skills the position requires with your employees’ current abilities. Understanding where there may be gaps will help you identify the types of training you need.

PRIORITIZE

Assign the training you’d like to provide into categories. Is it mandatory, or nice-to-have? If it’s absolutely required, a training effort becomes imperative. If it reflects an ideal situation that isn’t immediately feasible, you’ll know to plan for it in the longer term.

PLAN AND DELIVER THE TRAINING

Once you have assessed and prioritized the need for training, the next step is to secure what type of training you will use and how you will offer it. There are several factors to consider:

Types of training available

  1. Internal resources: Ask yourself what resources you have in-house.  Seasoned employees may be perfect to take on coaching or mentoring roles. Inexpensive to provide, these are among the most effective types of training
  2. External resources: Formal seminars, conferences, private trainers and videos are all good methods for learning. These tools are more expensive, but are professionally developed and often yield good results

Delivery options

One-on-one vs. group sessions, e-learning vs. in-person instruction, on-site or off-site? These questions will be answered by a blend of factors: what’s available, what best suits your needs, and what you can afford.

Your budget

It’s important to balance your need to save with the long-term benefit of developing staff. Try to determine the best type of training available for the amount you have to spend.

DON’T FORGET TO SECURE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF COMMITMENT

Before you can execute a training program, you need to have agreement from the senior person in your company that training is a priority. This person will need to support the plan fully and agree to milestones, costs, dates and deliverables.

Employee commitment is also required. Talk to your staff about the goals for the training and why it’s important to the business that they undertake the learning effort. Most often, employees will respond favourably to your investment in their development. Today’s employees look beyond their paycheques; they value and embrace opportunities to learn new skills.

ANALYZE TRAINING EFFORTS AND THEIR IMPACT

Training can be costly, so you will want to assess its impact. However, sometimes its effect cannot be translated simply into bottom line dollars and cents.

Ideally, you might track variables before and after training to verify improvements after development efforts. If the training was on customer service, the end result may be fewer customer complaints and/or an increase in sales. Training on a new computer system may net fewer errors or quicker processing. You may need to review why you sought training to begin with and whether your concerns have been remedied.

THINK LONG-TERM

Changes may not occur overnight, so it’s important to be patient. Training is a long-term investment, and often the benefits are not immediately obvious. However, your efforts in developing your people will help you in many ways. Staff will be more knowledgeable, they’ll be more likely to stick around, and your commitment to training will help you earn a reputation as an employer of choice

Planning Training Evaluation  Why Evaluate?To monitor the quality

January 8th, 2015 No comments

Training-Development

Planning Training Evaluation

 

Why Evaluate?

  1. To monitor the quality of training
  2. Provide feedback

3. To appraise the overall effectiveness of the investment in training

  1. To assist the development of new methods of training
  2. To aid the individual evaluate his or her own learning experience.

 

Eight decision points in planning training evaluation.

 

1. Should an evaluation be done? Who should evaluate?

 

2. What is the purpose of evaluation?

There are mainly two purposes of doing evaluation. They are justification evaluation and determination evaluation.

Justification evaluations are undertaken as reactions to mandates. Other purposes that will make evaluation efforts more fruitful. These purposes include training needs assessment, programme improvements and impact evaluation.

 

3. What will be measured?

The focus of the evaluation will be on training and delivery, programme content, materials, impact of training on individuals through learning, behaviour or performance change. Learning can be measured through pre-test and post-test. Evaluate the effects of training after the trainee returns to the work place using changes in between or the work results as indicators.

 

4. How comprehensive will the evaluation be?

The scope or the duration and comprehensiveness of the evaluation is influenced by available support, communication and evaluation purpose.

 

5. Who has the authority and responsibility?

Who has the authority and responsibility at different stages of evaluation will be determined by the factors like personnel, credibility of internal staff, communication, objectivity of internal staff to do an evaluation regardless of results.

 

6. What are the sources of data?

The most common sources of evaluation data are reactions, opinions and/ or test results of the participants, managers, supervisors, production records, quality control, financial records, personnel records, safety records, etc.

 

7. How will the data be collected and compiled?

Data can be collected before training for needs analysis or pre-testing purpose, during training programme to make improvements along the way and after training for evaluation.

 

Next step is selection of treatment or control groups and determination of nature of samples. Data can be complied either manually or by computers.

 

8. How will the data be analysed and reported?

First reporting issue is concerned with audiences like participants or trainees, training staff, managers, customers etc. Second and third issues are concerned with analysis and results and accuracy, policies and format respectively.

 

These decision points are intended to increase awareness of and interest in u. evaluation of training, to improve planning skills and to encourage more systematic- evaluation of training.

 

Methods of Evaluation

 

Various methods can be used to collect data on the outcomes of training. Some of these are:

 

Questionnaires: Comprehensive questionnaires could be used to obtain opinion reactions, views of trainees.

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Tests: Standard tests could be used to find out whether trainees have learnt anything during and after the training.

 

Interviews: Interviews could be conducted to find the usefulness of training offered to operatives.

Studies: Comprehensive studies could be carried out eliciting the opinions and judgments of trainers, superiors and peer groups about the training.

 

Human resource factors: Training can also be evaluated on the basis of employee satisfaction, which in turn can be examined on the basis of decrease in employee turnover, absenteeism, accidents, grievances, discharges, dismissals, etc.

 

Cost benefit analysis: The costs of training (cost of hiring trainers, tools to learn training centre, wastage, production stoppage, opportunity cost of trainers and trainees) could be compared with its  value (in terms of reduced learning time improved learning, superior performance) in order to evaluate a training programme.

 

Feedback: After the evaluation, the situation should be examined to identify the probable causes for gaps in performance. The training evaluation information.(about costs, time spent, outcomes, etc.)should be provided to the instructors’ trainees and other parties concerned for  control, correction and improvement of trainees’ activities. The training evaluator should follow it up sincerely so as to ensure effective implementation of the feedback report at every stage.

 

Please note that no training is complete without its evaluation. That is, the follow up of a training programme is very essential.

 

Impediments or problems in Training Process:

  • Management’s commitment is lacking
  • Aggregate spending on training is inadequate
  • The trainers may lack skills
  • Poaching
  • No help in case of downsizing
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