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The benefits of human resources certification

June 23rd, 2017 No comments

The benefits of human resources certification

 

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Many HR professionals devote hours of their own time studying for HR certification exams. Once they become certified, those HR professionals devote their own financial resources and time to continuing education so that they can maintain certification.

HR certification – Benefits to HR professionals and their organizations.

 

HR certification benefits for employees

The reasons individuals pursue certifications include demonstrating one’s professional achievement, fulfilling personal satisfaction, helping in career advancement, enhancing one’s understanding of the field, and earning recognition from peers.

Earning a certification may help an individual make a favorable impression during a job interview for showing potential employer about his/her knowledge and competencies and has the capability to do that job.

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  • Employee’s dedication to his/her HR career and updated with latest HR trends.
  • It gives more perception of more competent, more qualified and capable of performing better.
  • It helps in group decision making among peer since certified employee may be given more consideration.
  • It boosts employee’s moral and motivation for work. It is clearly reflected in self-confidence and self-satisfaction
  • HR certification considered as receiving better opportunities and higher salary and advancement

 

HR certification benefits for employer

 

From the organization’s perspective, HR certifications are used as a selection tool to identify the best fit and qualified candidate for the position.

 

Certifications help organizations determine whether applicants or employees can perform at an acceptable level in his job.

Employers can also use certifications to present an image of employee respect and authority.

Certification leads to lead more consistent ways to deal with information, challenges, conflicts etc., related to HR.

Encourage employees to perform in a better way with up to date skills and competencies.

 

Difference between HR certifications

The differences between the four designations are the amount of relevant work experience and level of training. The SHRM-CP and PHR are basic certifications and on a similar level of experience, while the SHRM-SCP and SPHR are both senior-level certifications. Candidates need to meet certain requirements for each type of certification. Here is a typical profile for each:

 

SHRM-CP 

  • Serves as a point of contact for staff and stakeholders
  • Delivers HR services
  • Performs operational HR functions
  • Implements policies and strategies
  • Requires at least three years of experience in an HR-related role if the candidate has obtained less than a Bachelor’s degree
  • Professionals with a Bachelor’s degree in an HR-related field require at least one year of experience in an HR role
  • Professionals with a Graduate degree require one year of experience in an HR role unless their degree is HR-related
  • Understands SHRM’s Body of Competency & Knowledge (BoCK)

SHRM-SCP

  • Develops HR strategies
  • Leads HR functions
  • Analyzes performance metrics
  • Aligns HR strategies to organizational goals
  • Has three-to-seven years of HR-related experience
  • Has an understanding of SHRM’s new Body of Competency & Knowledge (BoCK)

PHR

  • Focuses on program implementation
  • Has tactical/logistical orientation
  • Has accountability to another HR professional within the organization
  • Has two to four years of exempt-level generalist HR work experience, but because of career length may lack the breadth and depth of a more senior-level generalist
  • Has not had progressive HR work experience by virtue of career length
  • Focuses his or her impact on the organization within the HR department rather than organization wide
  • Commands respect through the credibility of knowledge and the use of policies and guidelines to make decisions

SPHR

  • Designs and plans rather than implements
  • Focuses on the “big picture”
  • Has ultimate accountability in the HR department
  • Has six to eight years of progressive HR experience
  • Has breadth and depth of HR generalist knowledge
  • Uses judgment obtained with time and application of knowledge
  • Has generalist role within the organization
  • Understands the effect of decisions made within and outside of the organization
  • Understands the business, not just the HR function
  • Manages relationships; has influence within the overall organization
  • Commands credibility within the organization, community, and field by experience
  • Possesses excellent negotiation skills

Certified individuals have usually issued a certificate attesting that they have met the standards of the credentialing organization and are entitled to make the public aware of their credentialed status, usually through the use of initials (i.e., SHRM-SCP or SPHR) after their names.

Your HR Career Success Depends Upon New Skills and Certification

To be an effective HR professional, candidates not only need to understand concepts such as strategic management, workforce planning, HR development and organizational management, but they also require practical skills to implement these concepts.

Online Master Certificate in Human Resource Management program is an ideal way to gain critical skills and prepare for the SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP certifications.

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Employee Engagement & Retention

May 31st, 2017 No comments

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Keeping the Right People

Employee Engagement & Retention

Employee engagement illustrates the commitment and energy that employees bring to work and is a key indicator of their involvement and dedication to the organization. Employees who are engaged are more productive, content and more likely to be loyal to an organization. When organizations put sound HR practices in place, they are more likely to discover that employees feel satisfied, safe and will work to their full potential…and that means they are more likely to stay put.

HR Responsibility and How it relates to employee engagement

Strategic HR Planning

  • People are the main resource that organizations have for delivering services
  • Strategic HR planning links HR management directly to an organization’s strategic plan and that means that staff will have meaningful roles tied to the strategic direction of the organization
  • Strategically planning how your organization will meet it’s current and future HR needs and how people will be supported and nurtured within your organization is critical for success

Operational HR Planning

  • At an operational level, organizations put in place HR management practices to support management and staff in achieving their day-to-day goals
  • Whether it’s determining how many employees are needed to deliver services over the next year or how performance will be monitored, the HR management practices and activities need to be planned to answer the question: “Where is our organization going and how will it get there?”
  • An operational plan ensures that employees are properly supported

Compensation and Benefits

  • Though usually not ranked the most important, compensation is an important factor in job satisfaction
  • An employee who feels adequately compensated monetarily is more likely to stay with your organization

 

Developing HR Policies

  • Policies and procedures both communicate the values of your organization and provide everyone with a consistent process to follow
  • Policies and procedures provide your employees with a process to follow and that knowledge can help them confidently approach situations, particularly difficult situations

Employment Legislation and Standards • Provincial/territorial and federal governments outline the minimum requirements to ensure a safe and equitable work environment for employees

Job Descriptions

  • Job descriptions are basic HR management tools that can help to increase individual and organizational effectiveness
  • A well-written job description sets an employee up for success by outlining their responsibilities and the parameters of their position
  • Job descriptions also show how an employee’s position contributes to the mission, goals, and objectives of the organization

Performance Management

  • Performance management is an ongoing process where the manager/supervisor and employee work together to plan, monitor, and review an employee’s work objectives or goals and overall contribution to the organization
  • Motivates employees to do their best
  • Establishes clear communication between the manager and the employee about what s/he is expected to accomplish
  • Provides on-going, constructive feedback on performance
  • Establishes plans for improving performance, as necessary
  • Identifies the skills and abilities of each employee so that work assignments build on and reflect an employee’s strengths
  • Identifies individual employees for more challenging work
  • Assists and supports staff in achieving their work and career goals by identifying training needs and development opportunities
  • Contributes to the succession management plan so that employee skills are developed and employers develop the skills they need to fill a potential HR gap in the future

Learning, Training and Development

  • Investing in training programs helps employees develop personally and professionally.
  • Creating an environment where people feel welcome and safe from harassment and discrimination motives staff to perform
  • Absenteeism and performance problems decrease while productivity, morale and employee retention increases

Work Teams and Group Dynamics

  • When you develop and support effective teams, you enhance the power and feeling of satisfaction of individuals working on the team
  • When a team works well, it means that staff trust one another and that leads to better sharing of knowledge and understanding

Conflict Resolution

  • In a healthy workplace, there will be conflict
  • Having conflict resolution policy and process will mean that conflict is constructive and not destructive

Workplace Wellness Initiatives

  • A healthy workplace means more than just warding off colds and the flu
  • It is more holistic and takes into consideration the physical, spiritual, environmental, intellectual, emotional, occupational and mental health of employees
  • Wellness promotion doesn’t just benefit the employee — an organization filled with healthy, balanced and fulfilled employees is a productive workplace that retains its employees

Employee Recognition

  • Giving employees a sense of shared values and purpose by creating a relationship with them.
  • When you thank employees you value them and that, in turn, is motivating
  • Updating staff on organizational issues through internal communications like e-mail updates and newsletters builds the sense of team and their value to the team

Staff-volunteer relations

  • Develop a sense of team with staff and volunteers contributing to the organization’s mission

Employee Satisfaction and Engagement Surveys

Listening to employees’ insights and suggestions for improvement will provide the organization with valuable information that can be acted upon to increase the level of employee engagement in the workplace. Employee surveys are an important tool to solicit employee feedback. They can be administered internally or externally as long as responses remain anonymous. Employee engagement surveys provide a way to improve productivity and emotional commitment by identifying the root causes of workplace issues.

Guidelines

The following steps provide a guideline for how to conduct an employee engagement survey:

  1. Determine the purpose of the survey.
  2. Determine the design of the survey (i.e. online versus paper-based; open-ended questions versus multiple choice or rating scale, etc.).
  3. Develop the questionnaire based on desired outcomes, while ensuring collection of accurate of data.
  4. Send employees the questionnaire for completion.
  5. Analyze survey responses.
  6. Prepare a summary report of the findings and recommendations for management (and possibly employee) review and discussion. (Ensure survey responses remain anonymous.)
  7. Prepare an action plan
  8. Benchmark survey results for a year-to-year comparison.

Action Plan

An action plan should be developed after discussing and prioritizing the results of the employee engagement survey. Although the plan is dependent on the outcomes of the engagement survey, it should be realistic and include the following items:

  • Action item
  • Person(s) who will be responsible implementing the action item
  • Resources required (i.e. money, materials, people)
  • Timeline – with expected completion date(s)
  • Expected outcome and/or how success will be measured

The action plan should be reviewed regularly and adjusted as required in order to achieve desired results. It is important to communicate and follow through on action plans. If employees see that action plans are implemented, they will be more likely to participate and provide feedback in the future.

Communication with Employees

Communication with employees is important to the success of the employee engagement survey. It should be done before, during and after implementation. This will generally make employees more likely to participate and provide feedback in the future. Communication to employees should include information about:

  • How the results will be used.
  • How specific action plans will be developed from the results of the survey and that input is required in order to properly formulate these plans.
  • How the results of the survey and any action plans developed will be reviewed and discussed.

 

Strategic HRM

June 21st, 2016 No comments

Strategic HRM

Strategic HRM

  • Strategic human resource management may be described as the linking of human resource strategy with strategic goals and objectives in order to improve business performance and foster an organizational culture of innovation and flexibility.
  • Strategic management deals with both ends and means. As ‘end’, it gives a vision of how things are likely to shape up. As ‘mean’, it shows the path of the vision’s realization in practice.
  • Strategic management is therefore, visionary management which is concerned with creating and conceptualizing ideas about the future of the organization. It is also empirical management, in that it decides how in practice it is going to get there, bearing in mind that organizations function in an environment of change and adaptation.

 

SHRM is the pattern of planned human resources deployments and activities intended to enable an organization to achieve its goals.

 

Objectives

  1. Identifying and analyzing external opportunities and threats that may be crucial to the company’s success
  2. Provides a clear business strategy and vision for the future
  3. To recruit, retain and motivate people
  4. To develop and retain of highly competent people
  5. To meet the expectations of the customers effectively

 

Meaning

  • Strategic human resource management is designed to help companies best meet the needs of their employees while promoting company goals. Human resource management deals with any aspects of a business that affects employees, such as hiring and firing, pay, benefits, training, and administration. Human resources may also provide work incentives, safety procedure information, and sick or vacation days.

About strategy

Strategy is basically a “military” term. However, it is not in this sense that it has implications for human resource management.

It was Peter Drucker who pointed out the importance of strategic decisions in 1955 in his book, The Practice of Management, in which he defined strategic decision as “all decisions on business objectives and on the means to reach them”.

  • A strategy is a pattern or a plan that integrates an organisation’s major goals, policies and action sequences in a coherent linear of decisions. A well-formulated strategy helps allocate an organisation’s resources optimally into a unique and viable matrix based on relative internal competencies, shortcomings, anticipated changes in the environment, and contingent moves by intelligent opponents

 

  • A Vision is a statement about what your organization wants to become. It should resonate with all members of the organization and help them feel proud, excited, and part of something much bigger than themselves.

Vision should stretch the organizations capabilities and image of    itself. It gives shape and direction to the organizations future.

  • Mission or purpose is a precise description of what an organization does.
  • Core values

Values are traits or qualities that are considered worthwhile; they represent an individual’s highest priorities and deeply held driving forces.

Scope of SHRM

The range of activities and themes encompassed by SHRM is complex and goes beyond the responsibilities of personnel or HR managers into all aspects of managing people and focuses on ‘management decisions and behaviors used, consciously or unconsciously to control, influence and motivate those who work for the organisation; in other words its human resource’ (Purcell, 2001). Mabey, Solomon and Storey (1998) have studied the subject from four distinct perspectives:

  • The social and economic context of SHRM, including factors in the internal (corporate) and external environment that influence the development and implementation of HR strategies;
  • The co-relation between SHRM and business performance, emphasizing the measurement of performance
  • Management style and the development of new forms of organisation
  • The relationship between SHRM and the development of organizational capability, particularly knowledge management.

 

Aspects of SHRM

 

  • Strategic human resource management (SHRM) includes;
  1. All those activities affecting the behavior of individuals in their efforts to formulate and implement the strategic needs of business.
  2. The pattern of planned human resource deployment and activities intended to enable the organisation to achieve its goals.
  3. That part of the management process that specializes in the management of human capital. It emphasizes that employees are the primary resource for gaining sustainable competitive advantage, that human resource activities need to be integrated with corporate strategy, and that human resource specialists help management meet both efficiency and equity objectives.

 

Features of SHRM

 

Features of strategic human resource management could be inferred as mentioned below:

  • Organizational level – Because strategies involve decisions about key goals, major policies and the allocation of resources, they tend to be formulated at the top;
  • Focus – Strategies are business-driven and focus on ‘organizational effectiveness’; people are seen primarily as resources to be managed towards the achievement of strategic business goals; and
  • Framework – Strategies by their very nature provide a unifying framework that is broad, contingency-based and integrative. They incorporate a full complement of the HR goals and activities designed specifically to fit extant environments and be mutually reinforcing and synergistic.

 

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