The benefits of human resources certification

June 23rd, 2017 No comments

The benefits of human resources certification

 

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Many HR professionals devote hours of their own time studying for HR certification exams. Once they become certified, those HR professionals devote their own financial resources and time to continuing education so that they can maintain certification.

HR certification – Benefits to HR professionals and their organizations.

 

HR certification benefits for employees

The reasons individuals pursue certifications include demonstrating one’s professional achievement, fulfilling personal satisfaction, helping in career advancement, enhancing one’s understanding of the field, and earning recognition from peers.

Earning a certification may help an individual make a favorable impression during a job interview for showing potential employer about his/her knowledge and competencies and has the capability to do that job.

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  • Employee’s dedication to his/her HR career and updated with latest HR trends.
  • It gives more perception of more competent, more qualified and capable of performing better.
  • It helps in group decision making among peer since certified employee may be given more consideration.
  • It boosts employee’s moral and motivation for work. It is clearly reflected in self-confidence and self-satisfaction
  • HR certification considered as receiving better opportunities and higher salary and advancement

 

HR certification benefits for employer

 

From the organization’s perspective, HR certifications are used as a selection tool to identify the best fit and qualified candidate for the position.

 

Certifications help organizations determine whether applicants or employees can perform at an acceptable level in his job.

Employers can also use certifications to present an image of employee respect and authority.

Certification leads to lead more consistent ways to deal with information, challenges, conflicts etc., related to HR.

Encourage employees to perform in a better way with up to date skills and competencies.

 

Difference between HR certifications

The differences between the four designations are the amount of relevant work experience and level of training. The SHRM-CP and PHR are basic certifications and on a similar level of experience, while the SHRM-SCP and SPHR are both senior-level certifications. Candidates need to meet certain requirements for each type of certification. Here is a typical profile for each:

 

SHRM-CP 

  • Serves as a point of contact for staff and stakeholders
  • Delivers HR services
  • Performs operational HR functions
  • Implements policies and strategies
  • Requires at least three years of experience in an HR-related role if the candidate has obtained less than a Bachelor’s degree
  • Professionals with a Bachelor’s degree in an HR-related field require at least one year of experience in an HR role
  • Professionals with a Graduate degree require one year of experience in an HR role unless their degree is HR-related
  • Understands SHRM’s Body of Competency & Knowledge (BoCK)

SHRM-SCP

  • Develops HR strategies
  • Leads HR functions
  • Analyzes performance metrics
  • Aligns HR strategies to organizational goals
  • Has three-to-seven years of HR-related experience
  • Has an understanding of SHRM’s new Body of Competency & Knowledge (BoCK)

PHR

  • Focuses on program implementation
  • Has tactical/logistical orientation
  • Has accountability to another HR professional within the organization
  • Has two to four years of exempt-level generalist HR work experience, but because of career length may lack the breadth and depth of a more senior-level generalist
  • Has not had progressive HR work experience by virtue of career length
  • Focuses his or her impact on the organization within the HR department rather than organization wide
  • Commands respect through the credibility of knowledge and the use of policies and guidelines to make decisions

SPHR

  • Designs and plans rather than implements
  • Focuses on the “big picture”
  • Has ultimate accountability in the HR department
  • Has six to eight years of progressive HR experience
  • Has breadth and depth of HR generalist knowledge
  • Uses judgment obtained with time and application of knowledge
  • Has generalist role within the organization
  • Understands the effect of decisions made within and outside of the organization
  • Understands the business, not just the HR function
  • Manages relationships; has influence within the overall organization
  • Commands credibility within the organization, community, and field by experience
  • Possesses excellent negotiation skills

Certified individuals have usually issued a certificate attesting that they have met the standards of the credentialing organization and are entitled to make the public aware of their credentialed status, usually through the use of initials (i.e., SHRM-SCP or SPHR) after their names.

Your HR Career Success Depends Upon New Skills and Certification

To be an effective HR professional, candidates not only need to understand concepts such as strategic management, workforce planning, HR development and organizational management, but they also require practical skills to implement these concepts.

Online Master Certificate in Human Resource Management program is an ideal way to gain critical skills and prepare for the SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP certifications.

Check online certification program here

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How GE chose John Flannery to be the next CEO

June 14th, 2017 1 comment

How GE chose John Flannery to be the next CEO

How the company has systematically developed succession planning for CEO.  

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Susan Peters as the head of HR at GE, the major responsibility is to deliver for investors, customers, and employees, the most important responsibility is to help develop the leaders of GE throughout the organization – with a special focus on senior leaders. Susan spent most of her career on leadership development and today GE announced the most important project she ever worked on… naming the next CEO of GE.

Jeff Immelt has been GE’s Chairman and CEO for 16 years. Over GE’s 125-year history we’ve had only 10 CEOs; an average tenure of 12.5 years. The average tenure of S&P 500 CEOs from 2001 to 2015 was 8.8 years. This is a big decision that will impact the course of GE for years to come. She adds we have millions of investors and hundreds of thousands of employees looking to this leader.

The environment we work in today demands greater leadership. As quoted before, the most effective leaders are the ones who can operate across multiple contexts and turn apparent chaos into opportunity. This requires courage, grit, and resiliency. It was through that lens that we built our process and the Board made its decision. Like all big decisions at GE, we did our homework. To say our CEO succession process has been deliberate is an understatement. It has been 6+ years in the making with relentless focus and discipline.

So how did GE do it?

First, we knew it would take years to move potential candidates through the leadership roles that would develop them. We began intentional moves of key leaders to give them new, stretch experiences with ever increasing exposure to complexity.

2012, we wrote the job description and then continuously evolved it. We focused on the attributes, skills and experiences needed for the next CEO, based on everything we knew about the environment, the company’s strategy and culture.  We did research; studying over 100 external leaders and articles to get the best understanding of the attributes needed today and in the future. We pulled our internal and external research together to create our “enterprise leadership capabilities,” a list of competencies essential for GE’s next great CEO. Our process reflected the recognition that CEO success is less about what they know going in and more about how fast they learn, experiences they have had, and their resilience.   

Also in 2012, the GE Board observed internal candidates and evaluated both internal and external candidates against our key criteria, using multiple sources of data. Our data goes back years and includes candidates’ track-record of leading global businesses and functions, business performance stats, executive reviews, leadership qualities, and feedback from those with whom they worked. After thoughtful deliberation, the GE Board decided on internal succession as the best path forward. Our internal CEO candidates continued to be exposed to bigger, more complex roles that would test them as leaders and develop them for our biggest leadership jobs in the company, including CEO.

In 2013, the timing of the transition was carefully contemplated. We considered our business planning process, the portfolio transformation, and the appropriate period of overlap between the incoming CEO and outgoing Chairman and CEO. Four years ago, the GE Board and Jeff Immelt agreed on a target date of Summer of 2017 as the right time to make the CEO transition.

Questions asked to the CEO.

Over the past month, the GE Board heard directly from the candidates about how they view the CEO role and their vision for GE. The Board challenged candidates with difficult questions and listened deeply to their thinking. Questions posed included things such as:

What would your current leadership team say they most appreciate about how you lead them?

  • How would you position GE to win in that environment?
  • What strategic changes would you drive, including capital allocation or portfolio management?
  •  What do you see as the most beneficial aspect of GE’s culture that would be important for you to maintain? What would you plan to change?
  • What is some of the toughest personal feedback you have received?
  •  What professional or personal experiences have helped shape your global perspective?
  •  How do you learn?

In John Flannery, our company’s next CEO, the GE Board has selected a life-long learner and a strong operator with global experience. He is someone who possesses the capabilities needed to lead, empower and inspire. Over 30-years with GE, John has shown that he thinks big, dives deep and is both adaptive and resilient. One of John’s hallmarks is how he engages the people and teams he leads.

While today’s announcement marks change for GE, it changes that has been carefully considered and meticulously planned by the GE Board and Jeff Immelt for more than six years. I encourage you to take a look at the infographic, which provides a more detailed look at our planning process.

At the end of the day these decisions are about people and delivering results for shareholders. Jeff Immelt has been a phenomenal CEO and leader for our company and in this process. It has been a privilege to be part of something so significant, including the now important work of ensuring seamless transitions, business excellence, and growing the next generation of GE leaders to the benefit of our investors, customers, team, and world.

 

Source: The inputs have been taken from Linkedin blog by Susan Peters – Senior Vice President, Human Resources at GE

 

Employee Engagement & Retention

May 31st, 2017 No comments

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Keeping the Right People

Employee Engagement & Retention

Employee engagement illustrates the commitment and energy that employees bring to work and is a key indicator of their involvement and dedication to the organization. Employees who are engaged are more productive, content and more likely to be loyal to an organization. When organizations put sound HR practices in place, they are more likely to discover that employees feel satisfied, safe and will work to their full potential…and that means they are more likely to stay put.

HR Responsibility and How it relates to employee engagement

Strategic HR Planning

  • People are the main resource that organizations have for delivering services
  • Strategic HR planning links HR management directly to an organization’s strategic plan and that means that staff will have meaningful roles tied to the strategic direction of the organization
  • Strategically planning how your organization will meet it’s current and future HR needs and how people will be supported and nurtured within your organization is critical for success

Operational HR Planning

  • At an operational level, organizations put in place HR management practices to support management and staff in achieving their day-to-day goals
  • Whether it’s determining how many employees are needed to deliver services over the next year or how performance will be monitored, the HR management practices and activities need to be planned to answer the question: “Where is our organization going and how will it get there?”
  • An operational plan ensures that employees are properly supported

Compensation and Benefits

  • Though usually not ranked the most important, compensation is an important factor in job satisfaction
  • An employee who feels adequately compensated monetarily is more likely to stay with your organization

 

Developing HR Policies

  • Policies and procedures both communicate the values of your organization and provide everyone with a consistent process to follow
  • Policies and procedures provide your employees with a process to follow and that knowledge can help them confidently approach situations, particularly difficult situations

Employment Legislation and Standards • Provincial/territorial and federal governments outline the minimum requirements to ensure a safe and equitable work environment for employees

Job Descriptions

  • Job descriptions are basic HR management tools that can help to increase individual and organizational effectiveness
  • A well-written job description sets an employee up for success by outlining their responsibilities and the parameters of their position
  • Job descriptions also show how an employee’s position contributes to the mission, goals, and objectives of the organization

Performance Management

  • Performance management is an ongoing process where the manager/supervisor and employee work together to plan, monitor, and review an employee’s work objectives or goals and overall contribution to the organization
  • Motivates employees to do their best
  • Establishes clear communication between the manager and the employee about what s/he is expected to accomplish
  • Provides on-going, constructive feedback on performance
  • Establishes plans for improving performance, as necessary
  • Identifies the skills and abilities of each employee so that work assignments build on and reflect an employee’s strengths
  • Identifies individual employees for more challenging work
  • Assists and supports staff in achieving their work and career goals by identifying training needs and development opportunities
  • Contributes to the succession management plan so that employee skills are developed and employers develop the skills they need to fill a potential HR gap in the future

Learning, Training and Development

  • Investing in training programs helps employees develop personally and professionally.
  • Creating an environment where people feel welcome and safe from harassment and discrimination motives staff to perform
  • Absenteeism and performance problems decrease while productivity, morale and employee retention increases

Work Teams and Group Dynamics

  • When you develop and support effective teams, you enhance the power and feeling of satisfaction of individuals working on the team
  • When a team works well, it means that staff trust one another and that leads to better sharing of knowledge and understanding

Conflict Resolution

  • In a healthy workplace, there will be conflict
  • Having conflict resolution policy and process will mean that conflict is constructive and not destructive

Workplace Wellness Initiatives

  • A healthy workplace means more than just warding off colds and the flu
  • It is more holistic and takes into consideration the physical, spiritual, environmental, intellectual, emotional, occupational and mental health of employees
  • Wellness promotion doesn’t just benefit the employee — an organization filled with healthy, balanced and fulfilled employees is a productive workplace that retains its employees

Employee Recognition

  • Giving employees a sense of shared values and purpose by creating a relationship with them.
  • When you thank employees you value them and that, in turn, is motivating
  • Updating staff on organizational issues through internal communications like e-mail updates and newsletters builds the sense of team and their value to the team

Staff-volunteer relations

  • Develop a sense of team with staff and volunteers contributing to the organization’s mission

Employee Satisfaction and Engagement Surveys

Listening to employees’ insights and suggestions for improvement will provide the organization with valuable information that can be acted upon to increase the level of employee engagement in the workplace. Employee surveys are an important tool to solicit employee feedback. They can be administered internally or externally as long as responses remain anonymous. Employee engagement surveys provide a way to improve productivity and emotional commitment by identifying the root causes of workplace issues.

Guidelines

The following steps provide a guideline for how to conduct an employee engagement survey:

  1. Determine the purpose of the survey.
  2. Determine the design of the survey (i.e. online versus paper-based; open-ended questions versus multiple choice or rating scale, etc.).
  3. Develop the questionnaire based on desired outcomes, while ensuring collection of accurate of data.
  4. Send employees the questionnaire for completion.
  5. Analyze survey responses.
  6. Prepare a summary report of the findings and recommendations for management (and possibly employee) review and discussion. (Ensure survey responses remain anonymous.)
  7. Prepare an action plan
  8. Benchmark survey results for a year-to-year comparison.

Action Plan

An action plan should be developed after discussing and prioritizing the results of the employee engagement survey. Although the plan is dependent on the outcomes of the engagement survey, it should be realistic and include the following items:

  • Action item
  • Person(s) who will be responsible implementing the action item
  • Resources required (i.e. money, materials, people)
  • Timeline – with expected completion date(s)
  • Expected outcome and/or how success will be measured

The action plan should be reviewed regularly and adjusted as required in order to achieve desired results. It is important to communicate and follow through on action plans. If employees see that action plans are implemented, they will be more likely to participate and provide feedback in the future.

Communication with Employees

Communication with employees is important to the success of the employee engagement survey. It should be done before, during and after implementation. This will generally make employees more likely to participate and provide feedback in the future. Communication to employees should include information about:

  • How the results will be used.
  • How specific action plans will be developed from the results of the survey and that input is required in order to properly formulate these plans.
  • How the results of the survey and any action plans developed will be reviewed and discussed.

 

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